Posts for: June, 2012

TestYourKnowledgeFrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutToothWhitening

What causes stains on teeth?

Staining can occur on the outside surfaces of teeth and is caused by foods such as red wine, coffee, and tea, as well as by tobacco use. They can also be developmental, affecting the structure of the teeth due to excessive fluoride levels or from tetracycline antibiotics given during childhood to name a few. Changes in a tooth's enamel or dentin during tooth formation, or as teeth age, can also cause discoloration.

What is going on inside a tooth's structure that makes it look stained?

Most of a tooth's covering (95 percent) is composed of highly mineralized enamel. The crystals of enamel are contained in a framework, or matrix, of organic matter. Dentists believe that various organic compounds that get into this matrix can cause staining.

How do whiteners work?

Tooth whiteners or bleaches expose the teeth to a peroxide compound. This creates reactive oxygen that breaks down highly colored organic compounds within the tooth's sub-surface matrix, making the tooth look whiter, but without changing its internal structure.

What professional in-office whitening techniques are available?

During treatment, a high concentration of peroxide solution in the form of a gel is applied directly on the teeth, often with activation by a heat or light source. These systems use custom tailored trays fitted to an individual's mouth. Silicone barriers or protective gels are used to keep the peroxide gel away from the gums or sensitive membranes in the mouth.

How are professional home whiteners different?

Home whiteners involve a less concentrated solution of peroxide in a gel form. It is delivered to the tooth surface by a bleaching tray that is custom-made in your dentist's office. Over-the-counter whiteners such as whitening strips or paint-on formulas can also be used, but they take longer and they're not as effective — the more diluted solutions are used for safety.

Can toothpastes really whiten teeth?

Mild abrasives in toothpastes clean surface stains but cannot change the underlying tooth color or remove significant staining.

How long do the results last?

Usually, the results last from six months to two years, but effects will diminish over time. You can make them last longer by avoiding the foods and habits that cause staining.

Are teeth whiteners safe to use?

Teeth whitening products are safe if used according to our recommendations or the product manufacturer's directions. Peroxide products may be toxic if used in excess of recommended intervals and amounts.

Read more about teeth whitening in the article “Teeth Whitening, Brighter, Lighter, Whiter...” Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss whether tooth whitening is right for you.


QuizYourselfonRootCanalTreatmentHowMuchDoYouKnow

Test yourself on your knowledge of this dental procedure.

  1. A root canal is
    1. A canal shaped structure in the root of your tooth
    2. A blood vessel carrying blood from your gum to your tooth
    3. An instrument used by your dentist in performing dental surgery
  2. Which of these are symptoms of root canal infection?
    1. Sharp, acute and intense pain, which is difficult to pinpoint
    2. Sharp pain when biting down on your tooth or on food
    3. Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods
    4. Dull ache and pressure
    5. Tenderness (accompanied by swelling) in the nearby gums
    6. All the above
  3. If you don't feel any pain you do not have a root canal infection.
    1. True
    2. False
  4. Root canal treatment is a very painful experience.
    1. True
    2. False
  5. Root canal treatment is called endodontic therapy. What does this word mean?
    1. Bringing the end of your problems
    2. Inside your tooth
    3. Fighting gum disease
  6. You need root canal treatment if
    1. The inside or pulp of your tooth becomes inflamed or infected
    2. Your tooth needs to be gently moved in order to correct your bite
    3. Acid erosion is damaging your tooth
  7. During root canal treatment the canals in your teeth are cleaned out and sealed off.
    1. True
    2. False
  8. Who is qualified to perform root canal treatment?
    1. General dentists
    2. Endodontists
    3. Both of the above
Answers
  1. a. A root canal is a canal shaped space within the root of a tooth that holds the tooth's pulp — which contains the tooth's nerves and blood vessels.
  2. f. — all of the above
  3. False. It is possible to have an infection that has stopped hurting but is still present and causing damage.
  4. False. Root canal treatment doesn't cause pain, it relieves it.
  5. b. The word comes from roots meaning “inside” and “tooth.”
  6. a.
  7. True. A small opening is made in the chewing surface of your tooth to gain access to the pulp. Dead and dying tissue is removed and the pulp is cleaned and disinfected. The canals are shaped and then sealed with filling materials to prevent future infection.
  8. c. All general dentists have received training in endodontic treatment and can perform most endodontic procedures. They often refer people needing complicated root canal treatment to endodontists, who have had specialized training in endodontic diagnosis and treatment.
Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about root canal treatment. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Common Concerns about Root Canal Treatment.”

By Dr. Manson
June 06, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: wisdom teeth  
7FAQsAboutImpactedWisdomTeeth

“Impacted wisdom teeth.” The term alone sounds ominous. What are wisdom teeth, why do they become impacted, what is the best way to treat them? These are questions people often ask.

What are “wisdom teeth” anyway?
Your third molars, located in the very back of your jaws, are your wisdom teeth. Most people have four of them.

Why is their name associated with wisdom?
They usually begin to come in when a person is 17 to 25 years old, a time when he or she can be said to begin to reach an age of wisdom.

Doesn't everyone get wisdom teeth?
While some people have more than four, others have fewer, and some have no wisdom teeth at all. Some people have wisdom teeth that can be seen in x-rays but do not erupt (grow up through their gums) and become visible.

What does “impacted” mean?
In normal usage, the term “impact” means “influence or effect.” In dental vocabulary, it means that a tooth is affecting another tooth or a nearby structure such as gums, nerves or blood vessels. Often an impacted wisdom tooth grows sideways into an adjacent tooth instead of growing upwards to come through the gums normally. This may be caused by a lack of room in your jaw for your third molars.

What kinds of problems can impacted wisdom teeth cause?
A wisdom tooth can impact the gum tissues surrounding nearby molars, leading to infection called “periodontal disease” (from the root words for “around” and “tooth.”) They can also cause root resorption in adjacent teeth, a process by which the tooth’s roots are slowly dissolved and eaten away.

What are the symptoms of impacted wisdom teeth?
Sometimes impacted teeth are asymptomatic — you feel nothing, even though damage is being done to gums and teeth surrounding the wisdom teeth. That's why it's a good idea to have regular checkups even if you are feeling no pain. Other times, impacted teeth can lead to acute inflammation and infection in surrounding gum tissues that is very painful.

Should I proactively have my wisdom teeth removed if they are not giving me any trouble?
Not necessarily but your wisdom teeth need to be evaluated. Generally speaking, however, it's better to remove wisdom teeth early, before they begin to cause dental problems. By the time a wisdom tooth starts to hurt, its neighboring teeth may already be in big trouble. In addition, younger people's wisdom teeth have undeveloped roots that make them easier to remove with fewer complications.

Contact our office for a full assessment and consultation about your wisdom teeth. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth: To Be Or Not To Be?




Contact Us

Steven B. Manson, DDS, FAGD

Long Island City, NY General Dentist
36-01 31st Street
Astoria, NY 11106
(718) 729-8383
Manhattan, NY General Dentist
136 East 57th Street
         Suite 1604
New York, NY 10022